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CTB Practitioner Level Guidelines & Expectations

Please bookmark this page for frequent reference, as this page will provide full guidelines for developing a practice and progressing efficiently through your program. If anything is unclear here, please email Zoë at admin@thaibodywork.com for clarification.

CTBP Coursework

CTB Muscle Checkout is broken into two categories: Muscle Knowledge and Muscle Treatment. The muscles required for checkout in the CTBP Certification program are listed below. As you continue to develop your practice, you will begin to see that the majority of pain complaints that come through your doors are directly connected to either a group of muscles related to the shoulder or the key muscles of the lower body. With this basic understanding, we can prepare you for the vast majority of cases by simply getting you comfortable with the analysis and treatment cycle for 11 muscles of the “lower” body and 13 in the upper body.

Muscle Checkout

CTB Muscle Checkout is broken into two categories: Muscle Knowledge and Muscle Treatment. The muscles required for checkout in the CTBP Certification program are listed below. As you continue to develop your practice, you will begin to see that the majority of pain complaints that come through your doors are directly connected to either a group of muscles related to the shoulder or the key muscles of the lower body. With this basic understanding, we can prepare you for the vast majority of cases by simply getting you comfortable with the analysis and treatment cycle for 11 muscles of the “lower” body and 13 in the upper body.

CTBP Belt System

Below are the stages through which CTBP students should progress through their program. In order to efficiently and effectively reach these stages, it is crucial that you:
  • Develop a working practice that allows you to complete each post-class assignment
  • Work on many different bodies and body types
  • Consistently work to increase your routine repertoire
  • Implement what you’ve learned in class as soon as you’ve learned it
    Practice, practice, practice

In general, the easiest way to keep your skills progressing is to do the work and do it often.

Following are the milestones represented by each belt: 

PRACTITIONER LEVEL

White Belt: Just starting out in 100 Level Classes (after first mentoring)
Yellow Belt: Has taken all 100 Level Classes and passed requirements with mentor
Orange Belt: Has taken all 300 Level Classes and passed requirements with mentor
Green Belt: Has taken Integrating the Practice and successfully demonstrated competency and preparedness for CTBP Certification Testing

PRACTITIONER LEVEL

Blue Belt: Has taken Advanced Practitioner body area courses and demonstrated protocol process to an instructor
Purple Belt: Has completed all Advanced Practitioner classes and practicum and has checked out of all involved muscles

MASTER LEVEL

Brown Belt: Has completed all Master Practitioner classes and checked out of individual muscles.
Black Belt: Has completed final Master Practitioner checkout and completed all Master requirements for Master Practitioner Certification.

Belt Criteria

The CTBP Final Practical Exam

You will perform a 90-minute session on a senior instructor, keeping these goals in mind.  With refined technique, relaxed body, proper body weight and smooth transitions, student will demonstrate their ability to address the pain or tension scenario provided by the instructor. Your skills will be assessed in the following areas:

  • Treatment Design: In 90 minutes, you will demonstrate your ability to treat upper or lower body pain complaints based on what instructor presents and your experience with the Upper and Lower Body Core Protocols.
  • Technique: You need to be comfortable with the foundational techniques that you were taught. The practical test is not a training session, although asking questions for clarification is permitted. Techniques are assessed on body mechanics, accurate palpation of fiber direction, ability to produce tissue change and recognizing when results are at a plateau and it’s time to move on.
  • Transitions and Flow: Your session should involve smooth transitions through the poses, considering that you are modeling for the client’s nervous system the experience of smooth, pain-free movement.
  • Assessment and Decision Making: CTB doesn’t use mindless sequences. You must be constantly assessing quality of motion, state of tissues and how they change in response to your work. You need to be able to detect even small signs of resistance and end-range during motion and provide tactile feedback, slowing down or otherwise modifying your techniques and movements according to the body’s signals, including possibly changing your treatment design on the fly.
  • Body Mechanics: You need to work in a manner that is sustainable for your own body and is reassuring for the client. If you work with a lot of tension or attempt to do ballistic stretches because you don’t have sufficient strength, this will be a strong negative.
  • Client Interaction and Setting: You need to provide a calming presence for the client, interview them prior to beginning the session for areas of concern, ensure that the room and your props are prepared in advance, be comfortable with temperature, lighting, music and other factors. During the session, you will be expected to provide an appropriate degree of interaction for this type of session. That means for example that you will interact with the client when you need more information, but you aren’t constantly asking for numeric pressure feedback, talking in a distracting manner or being completely silent when you might be confused about what is happening.

The teacher will provide you with feedback after the session. This is not a teaching session, and if you require extensive training during the test you will be asked to do more mentoring and come back (requires a retake fee).