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Treating Tennis Elbow with Clinical Thai Bodywork

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Tennis-Elbow-Diagram-400Amy Carr of TimeOut Chicago magazine came in a few years ago for a treatment. She's a tennis player, and wanted help with a persistent pain issue that had been bothering her for almost a year. Her pain was diagnosed as tennis elbow, or lateral epicondylitis, and she had seen several practitioners since the previous March without getting much relief.

Her report on our session appeared in the Feb. 5, 2009 issue of TimeOut Chicago, and to quote an excerpt, "Combining his knowledge of anatomy and Western medicine with Thai massage techniques, Duff gives my aching tennis elbow more relief than a year of cortisone shots and chiropractic visits..." Which is flattering, but in truth, cases like this are relatively easy to address by anyone with the right training.

It's all about your worldview. Allopathic western practitioners almost invariably assume that pain near a joint (for example, elbow, knee, lumbar vertebrae) is due to injury, dysfunction in the joint, or a mysterious onset of inflammation (tendonitis) in the tendons and ligaments that cross the joint. A quick Google search of tennis elbow will find thousands of pages all explaining what the "injury" of tennis elbow is all about. This often mistaken attitude about joint pain is what leads to the 3 common and frequently ineffective therapies that we hear in a litany from our clients: anti-inflammatory medications, cortisone shots and surgery. Unfortunately, many are still being told to ice their elbow, which is the worst possible strategy. While we consider our western medical system to be firmly based in science, one wonders what scientific reasoning is at work in the face of a great deal of evidence that these approaches usually don't work to actually relieve pain.

...Duff gives my aching tennis elbow more relief than a year of cortisone shots and chiropractic visits... Amy Carr, Editor, TimeOut Chicago

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